Giving back to the Corps on Flickr."I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me. I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job."
Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley
Drill instructor 
India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion

Giving back to the Corps on Flickr.

"I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me. I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job."

Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley
Drill instructor
India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion

Climb to the top on Flickr.Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Climb to the top on Flickr.

Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Low crawl on Flickr.Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Low crawl on Flickr.

Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Pugil on Flickr.Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Pugil on Flickr.

Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

I am looking into intelligence and am studying hard for my ASVAB this November, but I just wanted to know if it would be available for me or if I would have to do Delayed Entry Program when I graduate and start my enlistment paper work. Thank you though!

The only person who can answer that question for you definitively is your local recruiter. Historically, intelligence jobs are highly sought after, very competitive, and scarce. 

That said, I can almost guarantee you will enlist into the Delayed Entry Program and be there for at least a few months … this is a good thing! The DEP helps prepare you physically and mentally for boot camp and ultimately helps you become successfull.

140630-M-FS592-593 on Flickr.Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, put away equipment after pugil stick training June 30, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate a close-range encounter with an enemy. Recruits honed their bayonet skills as part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental character and physical development of recruits and Marines alike. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

140630-M-FS592-593 on Flickr.

Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, put away equipment after pugil stick training June 30, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate a close-range encounter with an enemy. Recruits honed their bayonet skills as part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental character and physical development of recruits and Marines alike. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Up and Over on Flickr.Rct. Daniel Guarente, Platoon 2069, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, weaves through a Confidence Course obstacle July 1, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is comprised of 15 obstacles designed to help Marine Corps recruits build confidence by overcoming physical challenges. Guarente, 18, from Quincy, Mass., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 5, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Up and Over on Flickr.

Rct. Daniel Guarente, Platoon 2069, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, weaves through a Confidence Course obstacle July 1, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is comprised of 15 obstacles designed to help Marine Corps recruits build confidence by overcoming physical challenges. Guarente, 18, from Quincy, Mass., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 5, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Water Survival on Flickr.Recruits of Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare to shed their gear underwater during water survival qualification June 9, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits have 10 seconds to remove pieces of heavy equipment before resurfacing, a process used to prevent drowning. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 8, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Water Survival on Flickr.

Recruits of Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare to shed their gear underwater during water survival qualification June 9, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits have 10 seconds to remove pieces of heavy equipment before resurfacing, a process used to prevent drowning. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 8, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Civilan to Marine-Pineda on Flickr.See the #transformation of a young man into a #Marine.

Civilan to Marine-Pineda on Flickr.

See the #transformation of a young man into a #Marine.

I just spoke with a recruiter a few days ago and, as long as I can get my weight in check, I'll be ready by March. My question is: should I start going to a firing range to practice or allow the Corps to teach me their way? I've got no fear of guns and shot a rifle a few times when I was young but I still consider myself new to guns since it's been years! Thank you.

The Marine Corps is going to teach you our way whether you like it or not! Recruits spend about a week learning and practicing the fundamentals of marksmanship before they get handed a single live round. We have marksmanship instructors whose soul function is to ensure recruits know how to shoot, and our instructors are some of the best in the world. You’d be wise to pay attention and let them do their job ;)

Good luck with your weight! Just make sure you’re training smart!