Eagle, Globe and Anchor on Flickr.Drill instructors present recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, with Marine Corps emblems, symbolizing the completion of their transformation into U.S. Marines, on Sept. 6, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Eagle, Globe and Anchor on Flickr.

Drill instructors present recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, with Marine Corps emblems, symbolizing the completion of their transformation into U.S. Marines, on Sept. 6, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Slide-for-Life on Flickr.Rct. Logan Borgelt, Platoon 1068, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, slides across a Confidence Course obstacle Sept. 5, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. On this obstacle, recruits slide down a rope, changing position twice while suspended over a small pond. The course is comprised of 15 obstacles designed to help Marine Corps recruits build confidence by overcoming physical challenges. Borgelt, 18, from Louisville, Ky., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 19, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Slide-for-Life on Flickr.

Rct. Logan Borgelt, Platoon 1068, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, slides across a Confidence Course obstacle Sept. 5, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. On this obstacle, recruits slide down a rope, changing position twice while suspended over a small pond. The course is comprised of 15 obstacles designed to help Marine Corps recruits build confidence by overcoming physical challenges. Borgelt, 18, from Louisville, Ky., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 19, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Gas! on Flickr.Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, clear their masks of tear gas July 22, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits experience temporary respiratory irritation, watery eyes and a burning sensation on the skin when exposed to tear gas, which is used to increase their confidence in the mask’s ability to protect them in a biologically or chemically contaminated environment. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Gas! on Flickr.

Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, clear their masks of tear gas July 22, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits experience temporary respiratory irritation, watery eyes and a burning sensation on the skin when exposed to tear gas, which is used to increase their confidence in the mask’s ability to protect them in a biologically or chemically contaminated environment. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Ready, Sprint! on Flickr.Recruits of Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, sprint during a combat conditioning session July 16, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Sessions such as this are meant to strengthen recruits to meet the Marine Corps’ high physical fitness standards and prepare them for the physical fitness and combat fitness tests, which are both graduation requirements. Alpha Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 19, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Ready, Sprint! on Flickr.

Recruits of Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, sprint during a combat conditioning session July 16, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Sessions such as this are meant to strengthen recruits to meet the Marine Corps’ high physical fitness standards and prepare them for the physical fitness and combat fitness tests, which are both graduation requirements. Alpha Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 19, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Over the log on Flickr.Rct. Kenneth Beard, Platoon 3066, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, hurdles a log on an obstacle course July 10, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is used to condition recruits mentally and physically and was designed to improve balance, coordination and physical strength while exposing them to the types of obstacles they may face in a battle zone. Beard, 21, from Auburn, Ala., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Over the log on Flickr.

Rct. Kenneth Beard, Platoon 3066, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, hurdles a log on an obstacle course July 10, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is used to condition recruits mentally and physically and was designed to improve balance, coordination and physical strength while exposing them to the types of obstacles they may face in a battle zone. Beard, 21, from Auburn, Ala., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 12, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Giving back to the Corps on Flickr."I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me. I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job."
Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley
Drill instructor 
India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion

Giving back to the Corps on Flickr.

"I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me. I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job."

Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley
Drill instructor
India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion

Climb to the top on Flickr.Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Climb to the top on Flickr.

Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Low crawl on Flickr.Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Low crawl on Flickr.

Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Pugil on Flickr.Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Pugil on Flickr.

Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)