Rct. Andrew Cabrera, Platoon 1029, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, looks through his weapon’s sights March 18, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits aim their unloaded weapons at a white barrel painted with targets that replicate what they will see at various distances. Recruits spent numerous hours each day practicing marksmanship fundamentals. Cabrera, a 19-year-old from Garnerville, N.Y., is scheduled to graduate May 2, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Rct. Andrew Cabrera, Platoon 1029, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, looks through his weapon’s sights March 18, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits aim their unloaded weapons at a white barrel painted with targets that replicate what they will see at various distances. Recruits spent numerous hours each day practicing marksmanship fundamentals. Cabrera, a 19-year-old from Garnerville, N.Y., is scheduled to graduate May 2, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

]]> About Faces <[[We ask recruits currently in training why they decided to endure 13 weeks of boot camp to earn the title of United States Marine. Here’s what one said:“I joined the Marine Corps to better my life and to prove to myself and to my family that I can overcome any obstacle – physical and mental.” Rct. Steven ShenofskyPlatoon 1028, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training BattalionAge: 23Hometown: Toledo, Ohio (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

]]> About Faces <[[

We ask recruits currently in training why they decided to endure 13 weeks of boot camp to earn the title of United States Marine. Here’s what one said:

“I joined the Marine Corps to better my life and to prove to myself and to my family that I can overcome any obstacle – physical and mental.” 

Rct. Steven Shenofsky
Platoon 1028, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion
Age: 23
Hometown: Toledo, Ohio 

(Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Patrick McGovern, senior drill instructor for Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, orders his recruits to move with intensity March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like McGovern, 26, from Whitman, Mass., must instill in recruits. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Patrick McGovern, senior drill instructor for Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, orders his recruits to move with intensity March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like McGovern, 26, from Whitman, Mass., must instill in recruits. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Rct. Kyle Proulx, Platoon 2045, Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, pushes his strength to its limit while doing crunches March 21, 2014, during a physical training session on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits performed various exercises meant to strengthen each of the main muscle groups and prepare them for the physical fitness and combat fitness tests, both of which are graduation requirements. Proulx, 20, from Mansfield, Ohio, is scheduled to graduate June 6, 2014. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple.)

Rct. Kyle Proulx, Platoon 2045, Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, pushes his strength to its limit while doing crunches March 21, 2014, during a physical training session on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits performed various exercises meant to strengthen each of the main muscle groups and prepare them for the physical fitness and combat fitness tests, both of which are graduation requirements. Proulx, 20, from Mansfield, Ohio, is scheduled to graduate June 6, 2014. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple.)

&lt; | &gt; Drill Instructor Spotlight &lt; | &gt;Only about 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 238-year legacy by transforming men and women into the next generation of Marines. This is one of those drill instructors. Name: Sgt. Lakisha HarrisNovember Company, 4th Recruit Training BattalionJoined Marine Corps in June 2003Became a DI in July 2013Military Occupational Specialty: Motorized transport specialist Hometown: Alliance, Ohio“I became a drill instructor because, for female Marines, the training has changed for the positive. The Marine Corps is transitioning to allowing females into more ground combat [military occupational specialties], and the training is more physical than when I went through. This is rewarding for me because I’m able to help condition the recruits mentally and physically for what they will face later in their careers.”(Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

< | > Drill Instructor Spotlight < | >

Only about 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 238-year legacy by transforming men and women into the next generation of Marines. This is one of those drill instructors. 

Name: Sgt. Lakisha Harris
November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion
Joined Marine Corps in June 2003
Became a DI in July 2013
Military Occupational Specialty: Motorized transport specialist 
Hometown: Alliance, Ohio

“I became a drill instructor because, for female Marines, the training has changed for the positive. The Marine Corps is transitioning to allowing females into more ground combat [military occupational specialties], and the training is more physical than when I went through. This is rewarding for me because I’m able to help condition the recruits mentally and physically for what they will face later in their careers.”

(Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Sgt. Donald White Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 1033, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, sings cadence as his recruits march during their introduction to close-order drill March 11, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. White, a 26-year-old from El Cajon, Calif., and his fellow drill instructors will spend nearly three months teaching their recruits drill movements and how to move and work as a team. With time and practice, the recruits will transform from clusters of clumsy individuals to confident, harmonious platoons. Alpha Company is scheduled to graduate May 30, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Sgt. Donald White Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 1033, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, sings cadence as his recruits march during their introduction to close-order drill March 11, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. White, a 26-year-old from El Cajon, Calif., and his fellow drill instructors will spend nearly three months teaching their recruits drill movements and how to move and work as a team. With time and practice, the recruits will transform from clusters of clumsy individuals to confident, harmonious platoons. Alpha Company is scheduled to graduate May 30, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Sgt. Francesco Franzese Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 3037, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, encourages Rct. Charles Coffran, Platoon 3034, to overcome his physical exhaustion March 11, 2014, during a physical fitness session on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits performed various exercises meant to strengthen each of the main muscle groups. Beginning their second week on the island, recruits participate in more than 30 physical fitness sessions meant to help them meet the Marine Corps’ high fitness standards. Franzese, 24, is from Brodheadsville, Pa. Coffran, 20, from Raynham, Mass., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Sgt. Francesco Franzese Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 3037, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, encourages Rct. Charles Coffran, Platoon 3034, to overcome his physical exhaustion March 11, 2014, during a physical fitness session on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits performed various exercises meant to strengthen each of the main muscle groups. Beginning their second week on the island, recruits participate in more than 30 physical fitness sessions meant to help them meet the Marine Corps’ high fitness standards. Franzese, 24, is from Brodheadsville, Pa. Coffran, 20, from Raynham, Mass., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. (photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Hallie Hilliard hugs her twin brother, Pfc. Joshua Hilliard, 21, after the conclusion of Golf Company’s graduation ceremony April 11, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Hilliard trained with Platoon 2028 and the siblings are from Lenoir, N.C. (Photo by Cpl. David Bessey)

Hallie Hilliard hugs her twin brother, Pfc. Joshua Hilliard, 21, after the conclusion of Golf Company’s graduation ceremony April 11, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Hilliard trained with Platoon 2028 and the siblings are from Lenoir, N.C. (Photo by Cpl. David Bessey)

Recruits of Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, climb a rope March 8, 2014, after completing a conditioning march on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits marched approximately eight miles with 60-pound packs to condition their bodies and prepare not only for future deployments but also their last test before graduating – the Crucible. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate April 11, 2014. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple.)

Recruits of Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, climb a rope March 8, 2014, after completing a conditioning march on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits marched approximately eight miles with 60-pound packs to condition their bodies and prepare not only for future deployments but also their last test before graduating – the Crucible. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate April 11, 2014. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple.)